“(Un)refuges” solo exhibition by Marco Noris at the Roman Temple of Vic

The series of paintings that Marco Noris is presenting at the Roman Temple is the first result of his work about exile and rootlessness; a journey between past and present, historical memory and contemporary migration policies.

From November 23, 2016 until January 1, 2017.
Opening: Friday, November 25 at 7pm
Temple Romà – Carrer Pare Xifré, Vic (Barcelona)

+ info: www.viccc2016.cat/novembre/inrefugis-de-marco-noris

(Thanks to Miquel Bardagil and Marta Huguet)

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On the Border

On the border – August 18, 2017 / September 11, 2017 / 280 km, 25 days, 198 border stones, 212 artworks

In the summer of 2017, Noris walked the 280 km of the Spanish-French border in the province of Girona, through which the principal routes of the republican exile ran. During the walk, the artist painted a work corresponding to each of the 198 milestones that mark the border. To walk and paint, joining together points along the border, as though balancing on that invisible line that divides in two that which is one, making visible what is invisible and opening up in this way a new stage for memory.

Over these past four years I have been working with the landscape as a stage and as a border, but always from the comfort and distance of the studio. The need for direct experience, to put myself out there and confront the real without any filters, is what led me to undertake “On the Border”.

The project involves walking the entire Spanish-French border in the county of Girona and making a small oil painting at each of the 198 milestones that mark the limit between the two countries. It will not be a visual documentation of the milestones (which have already been photographically catalogued), but rather an emotional recording of the environment, according to whatever the geographical and environmental conditions may be. For this reason, the extreme connection with the environment and the present moment that open-air painting permits is fundamental to allowing the project to acquire a strong experiential value. In this sense, the pieces are not the objective of the journey: the experience itself is the goal, the experience of making and being the border, the introspection of a long walk in nature, the journey and its difficulties. To paint pieces as if they were markers and to walk joining together points along the the border, as though balancing on that invisible line that divides in two what is one, is to make visible the invisible and thus open up a new setting for memory.

+ INFO


  1. A part of the project will be exhibited at the MuME between October 28 and January 28, 2018.
  2. Muga (“milestone”) is a word of Basque origin used in the Catalan Pyrenees instead of mojón (or hito, in Spanish) and fita (in Catalan). Here is an article written by Josep Estruch for “On the Border” on the etymology of the word.

On the border: 280 km, 25 days, 198 border stones, 212 artworks

Project and production: Marco Noris
Trip planning: Amaranta Amati y Marco Noris
Logistic support and guide: Amaranta Amati
Tutoring: Alexandra Laudo
3D prints: Patricio Rivera
Hikers: Paula Bruna, Natalia Carminati, Núria Casas, Joana Cervià, Albert Coma, Claudia Godoy, Alexandra Laudo, Jordi Martinez-Vilalta, Josep Rubio, Miquel Serrano, William Truini
Backups and transport: Kike Bela, Joana Cervià, Josep Rubio, Marc Ferrer-Dalmau y Alex Nogueras, Roberto Noris y Ana Lorente

Special thanks to: Amaranta Amati, Alexandra Laudo y todo el el jurado de BCN producció; a Roberto y Ana, Joana Cervià y Josep Rubio,Kike Bela, Patricio Rivera, Alex Nogueras y Marc Ferrer-Dalmau, Cayetano Martínez, Josep Estruch y Montserrat Rectoret Blanch, Rebeca Arquero, Clara Garí y El grand tour, Marc Badia, Xavier Aguilò,  Jordi Martinez-Vilalta, Claudia Godoy, Natalia Carminati, William Truini, Nuria Casas, Paula Bruna, Albert Coma, Ferrán Latorre, Carmen Sánchez, Pere Llobera, Miquel Serrano y Jordi Font del MUME, Zuriñe Etxebarria, Jordi Pi y el Club Excursionista de Gràcia, La Capella y su gente, Hangar.org y su gente, Piramidón y su gente…

Project produced with the support of BCN Producció’17. La Capella, Institute of Culture of Barcelona.
Logo La Capella

 

In collaboration with: 

MUME - Museo Memorial de ll'Exili Mojones de los Pirineos

(Un)refuges

Gallery updated on February 28, 2017

Valdelallama, León

Valdelallama, León

2015, oil on canvas, 33x41 cm

Valdemorilla, León

Valdemorilla, León

2015, oil on canvas, 33x41 cm

Alanis, Sevilla

Alanis, Sevilla

2015, oil on canvas, 33x41 cm

Alfacam, Granada

Alfacam, Granada

2015, oil on canvas, 27x35 cm

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow II

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow II

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow II - 2013 - 32x40 cm, oil on canvas

“Le ciel bas et lourd pèse comme un couvercle”

“Le ciel bas et lourd pèse comme un couvercle”

“Le ciel bas et lourd pèse comme un couvercle” - 2014 - 22x35 cm, oil on canvas

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow I

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow I

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow I- 2013 - 100x130 cm, oil on canvas

Border crossings of exile: Coll de Malrem

Border crossings of exile: Coll de Malrem

Coll de Malrem - 2014 - 90x146 cm, Oil on canvas

¿Qué hicieron de vos, hijo que no acabó de vivir? ¿acabó de morir? ((Un)refugees IV)

¿Qué hicieron de vos, hijo que no acabó de vivir? ¿acabó de morir? ((Un)refugees IV)

“What did they do to you, son, who did not quite live? did not quite die? ((Un)refugees IV) - 2014 - 130x97 cm, oil on canvas

(Un)refugees II

(Un)refugees II

(Un)refugees II - 2014 - Oil on canvas, 146 x 146 cm

(Un)refugees III

(Un)refugees III

(Un)refugees III - 2014 - 170x120 cm, Oil on canvas

(Un)refugees I

(Un)refugees I

(Un)refugees I - 2014 - 130x89 cm, oil on canvas

Rivesaltes (Ruins IV)

Rivesaltes (Ruins IV)

2013, oil on canvas, 40x30cm

Rivesaltes (Ruins I)

Rivesaltes (Ruins I)

Rivesaltes (Ruins I) - 2013 - 19x33 cm - Oil and bitumen of Judea on canvas

(Un)refuge

(Un)refuge

2016, oil on canvas, 60x81 cm

Mediterranean beach

Mediterranean beach

2016, oil on canvas, 33x60 cm


European tumulus

European tumulus

2016, oil on canvas, 30x30 cm

Child - (Un)refugees VII

Child - (Un)refugees VII

2015, oil on canvas, 46x36 cm

Line - (Un)refugees VI

Line - (Un)refugees VI

2015, oil on canvas, 38x61 cm

(Un)refugees IX

(Un)refugees IX

2016, oil on canvas, 100x81


(Un)refugees VIII

(Un)refugees VIII

2015/2016, oil on canvas, 100x100


Camp

Camp

Camp - 2015, oil on canvas, 100x100

Mound with Moun

Mound with Moun

2016, oil on canvas, 30x30 cm

Mounds

Mounds

2016, oil on canvas, 24 x 33 cm

Mounds (Nocturne)

Mounds (Nocturne)

2016, oil on canvas, 24 x 33 cm

The ruins and the shadow IV

The ruins and the shadow IV

2016, oil on canvas, 65x92 cm

Rivesaltes (camp II)

Rivesaltes (camp II)

2016, oil on canvas, 70x100 cm

Alfacar, Granada

Alfacar, Granada

2017, oil on canvas, 100x130 cm

Maremortum II

Maremortum II

2016, oil on canvas, 163x163 cm


Maremortum I

Maremortum I

2016, oil on canvas, 100x100 cm


A few years ago, during a visit to the Exile Memorial Museum of La Jonquera (Museu Memorial d’Exili – MUME), I read for the first time about Camp de Rivesaltes, also known as Camp Maréchal Joffre, a former concentration camp in the south of France which was first opened in the 1930s to accommodate Spanish exiles. The camp remained open for nearly 70 years, and it was also used as a concentration camp during the Nazi occupation and then as an internment camp for Algerian Harkis. The history of Rivesaltes is a dramatic account that takes us through the entire 20th century, which is why it is used as a guide to research the most tragic events of contemporary European history. Rivesaltes is not exclusively a geographical location. It is also, – or especially, now that the ruins have made way for memory – a collective emotional space.

(Un)refuges has therefore been conceived from the debris of the camp, persecutor and witness to the atrocity of the Nazi deportations and the drama of exile of thousands of people. The memory of Rivesaltes is the current reality of the camps that hold millions of lives, millions of refugees, millions of dramas all over the world and at the doors of the European Union.
Nevertheless, this is not a work about Rivesaltes, nor is it historical research. In this case, history is really the guide to a journey in the collective emotional memory, seeking the universality of individual experience, beyond eras, boundaries and nationalities.

The (un)refuges are the physical and emotional places of uprooting, where the need for shelter is accompanied by its refusal and where the solution to the tragedy is only the lesser evil. The camps are (un)refuges and they certify the loss of dignity and identity of refugees, broken, separated from their roots, their land, their past. Places where burial frequently follows exile. Mass graves, holes, burial mounds, boxes: symbolic (un)refuges, cynical alternatives to cynical European policies. And finally (un)refuged as an intrinsic condition of the exiled, where the impossibility to return home goes hand in hand with the absolute and definitive impossibility to have a new home, because uprooting is an irreversible trauma that affects the actual fundamentals of human beings.

Marco Noris

The Age of Rivesaltes

 I am writing about a theme that nobody likes.
Myself included.
Some themes are liked by nobody.
Po I-Po

Rivesaltes

The Camp Joffre de Rivesaltes, commonly known as Camp de Rivesaltes, is a french military camp which was used between 1939 and 2007 as military base and as concentration or civilian internment camp. Rivesaltes is located just north of Perpignan, in southeastern France, close to the border with Spain.

The Camp of Rivesaltes has held refugees fleeing the Franco dictatorship after the end of Spanish the civil war; it has held Jews and other victims of the Vichy regime. During the post-war period, it also held Russian, Italian and German prisoners of war. After that it was for a time used to house and train North Africans to help with the rebuilding of France. During the Algerian war it served as a prison, as a military training camp, as a transit camp for North Africans (1962), and successively up until 1977 as a rehabilitation camp for a large Harki community fleeing post-war Algeria; around 20 000 people passed through the camp from 1962 to 1964. Between 1984 and 2004 it became one of the largest administrative detention centers for illegal immigrants in France, a lot of them Spanish.

The camp now stands in ruins. At the end of 2007 the decision was made to convert it into a memorial museum, the construction of which is still ongoing.

I learned of the existence of the Camp Joffre de Rivesaltes in June 2012, while visiting the Exile Museum in the border town of La Jonquera. I was shocked by its long and very recent history, spanning a large part of the 20th century, bearing witness and testament to the most painful side of Europe’s modern history. I was touched, at a human level, and felt directly involved, as a European citizen, as an adopted Catalan (I have lived in Catalunya for over 10 years), and as a contemporary exile.

I started to investigate the history of Rivesaltes and reading the testimonies of those who had had the misfortune of living there.

In April 2013 I visited the camp for the first time.

The project

This project is born from the rubbles of the camp, in its day both executioner and witness to human grief, and now, through its ruins, physical testament to the horror of Nazi deportations and to the tragedy of the exile of thousands of human beings.

Rivesaltes is an investigation around the drama of exile and human displacement. It is a reflection on the loss of identity, on the annihilation of the human being and of his/her moral and social values.

My work addresses the universality of individual experience, beyond any notion of border, nationality or epoch: the camp’s ruins represent the past connecting with the present and with the European Union’s current immigration policy. The memory of Rivesaltes is the reality of today’s immigration detention centers, where thousands of lives, thousands of refugees, thousands of personal dramas are held.

Logo La Escocesa
This project received a grant in 2013 from the La Escocesa Visual Art Factory in Barcelona and is still ongoing.