(Un)refuges

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Gallery updated on February 28, 2017

Valdelallama, León

Valdelallama, León

2015, oil on canvas, 33x41 cm

Valdemorilla, León

Valdemorilla, León

2015, oil on canvas, 33x41 cm

Alanis, Sevilla

Alanis, Sevilla

2015, oil on canvas, 33x41 cm

Alfacam, Granada

Alfacam, Granada

2015, oil on canvas, 27x35 cm

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow II

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow II

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow II - 2013 - 32x40 cm, oil on canvas

“Le ciel bas et lourd pèse comme un couvercle”

“Le ciel bas et lourd pèse comme un couvercle”

“Le ciel bas et lourd pèse comme un couvercle” - 2014 - 22x35 cm, oil on canvas

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow I

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow I

Rivesaltes: The ruins and the shadow I- 2013 - 100x130 cm, oil on canvas

Border crossings of exile: Coll de Malrem

Border crossings of exile: Coll de Malrem

Coll de Malrem - 2014 - 90x146 cm, Oil on canvas

¿Qué hicieron de vos, hijo que no acabó de vivir? ¿acabó de morir?  ((Un)refugees IV)

¿Qué hicieron de vos, hijo que no acabó de vivir? ¿acabó de morir? ((Un)refugees IV)

“What did they do to you, son, who did not quite live? did not quite die? ((Un)refugees IV) - 2014 - 130x97 cm, oil on canvas

(Un)refugees II

(Un)refugees II

(Un)refugees II - 2014 - Oil on canvas, 146 x 146 cm

(Un)refugees III

(Un)refugees III

(Un)refugees III - 2014 - 170x120 cm, Oil on canvas

(Un)refugees I

(Un)refugees I

(Un)refugees I - 2014 - 130x89 cm, oil on canvas

Rivesaltes (Ruins IV)

Rivesaltes (Ruins IV)

2013, oil on canvas, 40x30cm

Rivesaltes (Ruins I)

Rivesaltes (Ruins I)

Rivesaltes (Ruins I) - 2013 - 19x33 cm - Oil and bitumen of Judea on canvas

Maremortum I

Maremortum I

2016, oil on canvas, 100x100 cm


Maremortum II

Maremortum II

2016, oil on canvas, 163x163 cm


(Un)refuge

(Un)refuge

2016, oil on canvas, 60x81 cm

Mediterranean beach

Mediterranean beach

2016, oil on canvas, 33x60 cm


European tumulus

European tumulus

2016, oil on canvas, 30x30 cm

Child - (Un)refugees VII

Child - (Un)refugees VII

2015, oil on canvas, 46x36 cm

Line - (Un)refugees VI

Line - (Un)refugees VI

2015, oil on canvas, 38x61 cm

(Un)refugees IX

(Un)refugees IX

2016, oil on canvas, 100x81


(Un)refugees VIII

(Un)refugees VIII

2015/2016, oil on canvas, 100x100


Camp

Camp

Camp - 2015, oil on canvas, 100x100

Mound with Moun

Mound with Moun

2016, oil on canvas, 30x30 cm

Mounds

Mounds

2016, oil on canvas, 24 x 33 cm

Mounds (Nocturne)

Mounds (Nocturne)

2016, oil on canvas, 24 x 33 cm

The ruins and the shadow IV

The ruins and the shadow IV

2016, oil on canvas, 65x92 cm

Rivesaltes (camp II)

Rivesaltes (camp II)

2016, oil on canvas, 70x100 cm

Alfacar, Granada

Alfacar, Granada

2017, oil on canvas, 100x130 cm

A few years ago, during a visit to the Exile Memorial Museum of La Jonquera (Museu Memorial d’Exili – MUME), I read for the first time about Camp de Rivesaltes, also known as Camp Maréchal Joffre, a former concentration camp in the south of France which was first opened in the 1930s to accommodate Spanish exiles. The camp remained open for nearly 70 years, and it was also used as a concentration camp during the Nazi occupation and then as an internment camp for Algerian Harkis. The history of Rivesaltes is a dramatic account that takes us through the entire 20th century, which is why it is used as a guide to research the most tragic events of contemporary European history. Rivesaltes is not exclusively a geographical location. It is also, – or especially, now that the ruins have made way for memory – a collective emotional space.

(Un)refuges has therefore been conceived from the debris of the camp, persecutor and witness to the atrocity of the Nazi deportations and the drama of exile of thousands of people. The memory of Rivesaltes is the current reality of the camps that hold millions of lives, millions of refugees, millions of dramas all over the world and at the doors of the European Union.
Nevertheless, this is not a work about Rivesaltes, nor is it historical research. In this case, history is really the guide to a journey in the collective emotional memory, seeking the universality of individual experience, beyond eras, boundaries and nationalities.

The (un)refuges are the physical and emotional places of uprooting, where the need for shelter is accompanied by its refusal and where the solution to the tragedy is only the lesser evil. The camps are (un)refuges and they certify the loss of dignity and identity of refugees, broken, separated from their roots, their land, their past. Places where burial frequently follows exile. Mass graves, holes, burial mounds, boxes: symbolic (un)refuges, cynical alternatives to cynical European policies. And finally (un)refuged as an intrinsic condition of the exiled, where the impossibility to return home goes hand in hand with the absolute and definitive impossibility to have a new home, because uprooting is an irreversible trauma that affects the actual fundamentals of human beings.

Marco Noris